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The government wants to regulate tuktuks by national licensing system and nudging drivers to convert to natural gas-powered minibuses.
09.07.21 | Interesting article at Devdiscourse

To others they are a cheap way of getting from A to B in a fraction of the time it takes on public transport. Now the government wants to regulate tuktuks - three-wheeled motorised rickshaws or mini-cabs - by introducing a national licensing system and nudging drivers to convert to natural gas-powered minibuses.


To some they are a nuisance as they weave through traffic on Egypt's chaotic city streets or zip down narrow alleyways. To others they are a cheap way of getting from A to B in a fraction of the time it takes on public transport.


Now the government wants to regulate tuktuks - three-wheeled motorised rickshaws or mini-cabs - by introducing a national licensing system and nudging drivers to convert to natural gas-powered minibuses. Officials estimate there may be as many as 4 million tuktuks in Egypt, but they are either unlicensed or licensed under a patchwork of local rules.